Welcome to the Astronomical Society of South Australia

The Astronomical Society of South Australia is the only representative body for amateur astronomy in the state of South Australia. Founded in 1892 and with around 600 members, it is the oldest and one of the largest organisations of its kind in Australia.


Our monthly meetings, which usually feature a guest speaker, are free, open to the public and visitors are most welcome to attend.


Variable Stars Astronomy Education

Wednesday, 7 September 2016 7:00 PM

As a conclusion to the series on Stellar Evolution, we will take a look at Variable Stars. This will include exploring such objects as cepheid variables, long period variables like Mira, eclipsing binaries and cataclysmic variables like Eta Carina.


Australia and the Giant Magellan Telescope General Meeting

Wednesday, 7 September 2016 8:00 PM

Australia is playing a major role in the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) project, building two of the first-generation GMT instruments and key components of the adaptive optics system that will give GMT the sharpest resolution of any telescope - nearly 10 times better than Hubble and 3 times better than JWST. Combined with the largest light-collecting area of any telescope, this will enable GMT to do some extraordinary science. Amongst other things, GMT will be able to detect the very first stars to form in the universe, trace the assembly of galaxies over the whole of cosmic history, and analyse the atmospheres of planets orbiting nearby stars.


Galaxies Astronomy Education

Wednesday, 5 October 2016 7:00 PM

After exploring our own galaxy, The Milky Way, we will look at the Local Group of Galaxies and beyond. The various types of galaxies will be discussed and how they are classified using Hubble’s Tuning Fork diagram.


Multi-Messenger Astronomy. Fashionable, but is it real? General Meeting

Wednesday, 5 October 2016 8:00 PM

The expression "multi-messenger astronomy" is quite a new term, which is becoming commonly used in astronomy, perhaps most often in funding applications. It seems to refer to the combined use of many astronomical techniques, and instruments at different wavelengths or with different 'messengers', to get an understanding of the objects which we see in the sky. Some of us would say that it what we have been doing for decades but it is a new idea for people in some areas of astronomy. Emeritus Prof. Roger Clay (University of Adelaide) will try to explain how the use of information using multiple wavelengths and messengers can allow us to get to a real understanding of how astronomical objects really work.

Public Star Nights

Experience the night sky through our telescopes at public viewing nights.

Friday 2 September
Thursday 8 September
Friday 9 September

Members' Diary

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Latest Issue

Inside The Bulletin

Each month the Society publishes The Bulletin - a 16 to 20 page newsletter for members, containing information on astronomical news and events.

This month's issue includes:

  • Astronomy landscapes in Germany - Part II
  • Was Planet 9 once an exoplanet, stolen by our sun?
  • NGC 247 and Burbidge’s Chain of Galaxies
Read now

Membership

Membership is open to people of all ages and professions— the only pre-requisite is an interest in astronomy. It does not matter how much you know about astronomy or any other science. The Society has something for you.Our members come from all walks of life. What they share is the enjoyment the night sky has to offer.

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